HomeNewsLatest NewsSeveral Schools In England Informally Exclude Female Students

Several Schools In England Informally Exclude Female Students

Schools in England are informally excluding girls at a higher rate than boys and their experiences are unapparent as they are excluded in official statics.

Schools in England are informally excluding girls at a higher rate than boys and their experiences are unapparent as they are excluded in official statics.

A recent study revealed that while boys are most likely to be formally excluded, girls in some England schools are excluded through moves to other schools or early exit, hence they leave before the end of year 11 but do not finish school elsewhere.

The Social Finance associate director, Sara Parsonage, said the conclusions drawn by the research revealed a possible weak link in national statistics.

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About three-quarters of formal exclusions, both permanent and fixed-term, involved boys, the study showed. However, in the case of “early exits”, which is one of the so-called informal exclusion routes, the rate among boys was just above 4 per cent while among girls it was just below 6 per cent.

In Cheshire West and Chester, the exclusion rate is below the national average. Following an increase in 2017/18 and the change in the nature of exclusions, the council collaborated with Social Finance to try to identify those who are vulnerable to the exclusion and come up with best ways to assist them.

A cabinet member for children and families at Cheshire West and Chest council, Robert Cernik, said: “Formal permanent exclusions rely on a panel decision made with involvement from the school, governors, the council and the child’s parent/carer.

“The decision is recorded in schools’ data, along with the reason for exclusion. This can trigger support for the child and parents or carers have the right to request a review of the decision.

“‘Informal’ exclusions do not result in flags against a child’s name in the way formal ones do. But they also do not result in the same processes that provide accountability checks and balances for the child and parent/carer. This means girls may be missing out on support available to excluded children.”

A senior researcher in mental health, wellbeing and inclusion at the Education Policy Institute, Whitney Crenna-Jennings, said at national level EPI research had found that girls are as likely as boys to have unexplained exits from the school, but are far less likely to be formally excluded.

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