Following Public Ridicule, Met Police Quietly Discard “Wave Down A Bus”

The guidance, which was published after Wayne Couzens was sentenced to life in prison was not well received by the public domain.

Following Public Ridicule, Met Police Quietly Discard
Following Public Ridicule, Met Police Quietly Discard "Wave Down A Bus"

Met Police has quietly jettisoned its “wave down a bus” recommendation to the public after it met with public ridicule.

Following the murder of Sarah Everard by a former Met Police officer, Daniel Couzens, the force had conjectured the “wave down a bus” advice for members of the public who feel threatened or endangered by a police officer that accosts them in public places.

But the guidance, which was published after Wayne Couzens was sentenced to life in prison was not well received by the public domain.

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Met Police, which is yet to confirm whether the guidance still reflects the position of the force has now deleted the “wave down a bus” recommendation from its website.

Members of the public who rejected the guidance said it was impractical, neither did it deal with the problem itself, which is violence against women and girls.

48-year old Couzens, a serving police officer at the time used a genuine warrant card and police-issue handcuffs to arrest Sarah Everard.

Couzens kidnapped the 33-year-old, raped and ultimately murdered her.

After Couzens’ trial, Met Police contrived the “wave down a bus” idea to help women verify the identity of an acclaimed police officer in mufti.

The guidance was initially issued through a press release and has since been published on the Met Police official website.

However, recent checks reveal that the recommendations have been significantly rewritten from what was first put out.

When it was first published, the advice suggested “shouting out to a passerby, running into a house, knocking on a door, waving a bus down or if you are in the position to do so calling 999” as a last resort.

The guidance has now been slashed to only include shouting out to a passerby or calling 999.

Patsy Stevenson, who is suing Met Police after being arrested at a vigil honouring Sarah Everard, slated the force for not holding its hands up.

“This is literally what the Met do, they realise they have done something wrong and try to cover it up and push it to one side instead of admitting fault,” she said.

“This shows yet again lack of accountability. They need to address these failings to the public when they happen and tell us how they are going to regain our trust, rather than ignore it and hope it goes away.”

Met Police Commissioner Cressida Dick, in the wake of the public opprobrium against “wave down a bus,” publicly defended the guidance.

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“So I think this was rather taken out of context,” the Commissioner said.

“I think we all realise that a lone woman being approached by a man in plain clothes, reporting to be a police officer, might be concerning and my officers, my male officers, understand that absolutely.”

“It will be rare for a woman to meet a single, plain clothes officer. I can’t rule it out but it will be a rare occurrence. The officer will be sensitive to the fact that the person may be concerned.”

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